A 1 minute read
Dec 12, 2014 11:24:11 AM

It’s getting harder and harder for doctors to remain independent and for smaller practices to thrive.

Especially with the Affordable Care Act and private insurance initiatives, many primary care practices are consolidating into larger medical groups.  Financial considerations are on the main drivers of this trend.

Compared to smaller physician groups, these larger medical groups have higher adoption of EHR and other health information technologies, as it is easier to divide expenses across a larger revenue base.

Definitive Healthcare’s physician group database tracks intelligence on 191,563 practicing physician groups.  Out of this total number, here is a list of the top ten largest physician groups, by number of group practice members.

1. The Permanente Medical Group (5,445)
2.  Southern California Permanente Medical Group (4,644)
3.  Mayo Clinic – Rochester (3,309)
4.  The Cleveland Clinic Foundation (3,116)
5.  University of Pittsburgh Physicians (2,590)
6.  Massachusetts General Physicians Organization (2,204)
7.  University of Michigan Faculty Group Practice (2,088)
8.  John Hopkins University (1,872)
9.  Association of University of Washington Physicians (1,850)
10.  Allina Medical Clinic (1,790)

Nine out of ten of these physician group’s main specialty is cited as Internal Medicine.  Only the University of Pittsburgh Physicians cited their specialty as Anesthesiology – Certified Registered Nurse.

The Physician Group Type, however, varied between Single/Multi-Specialty Physician Group and Academic/Faculty Practice, although the top three largest physician groups (Permanente Medical Group, Southern California Permanente Medical Group, and the Mayo Clinic) were all the Single/Multi-Specialty Physician Groups.

The Permanente Medical Group and Southern California Permanente Medical Group are both not only based out of California but are both part of the same network, Kaiser Permanente Health Foundation.

The number of group practice members includes all employees at the practice versus just the number of practicing physicians.


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